Ireland’s Guide To Money And Living

What are you worth?

Stuart Miles/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Stuart Miles/
FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It’s a new year, and many of us have new plans for our working lives, whether it’s changing roles, jobs, or simply seeking a raise.

A survey carried out by IrishJobs.ie has revealed that 69% of workers plan to ask for a raise of some size this year. Half of the workers questioned said they would be happy to move jobs in search of more money. The number of online job vacancies increased by 7% in 2014.

According to Safann MacCarthy, Marketing Director, IrishJobs.ie: “We are seeing a sustained increase in total jobs across management, executive, contract roles advertised across construction, manufacturing, and many services related industries. Alongside the rise in total jobs advertised, there is a boost in jobs market sentiment with people expecting things to further improve. Approximately 7 in 10 plan to ask for a raise, in sync with recent IBEC reports projecting salary increases of on average 2 per cent from an employer point of view. Almost half of those surveyed who are currently employed would move job for more money.”

Resolving to ask for a pay rise is one thing, actually doing it is another. So how should you go about the process? Before you even start the process, you need to have a backup plan in place, as you might be told ‘no’. In the event of the request being turned down, you might become even more dissatisfied with your job as well as the pay. So keep an eye out for similar roles in your field. In addition, make sure that you actually deserve a raise, that you’re working harder than would normally be expected of you, and that your performance deserves an increase. It’d be a little embarrassing if you sit down with your boss only to discover the only real reason you’d like a raise is because you’d like more money.

For the actual meeting, be sure to come prepared. Be able to highlight your worth to the company and what you bring to the table, in relation to your skill set. Mention recent successful projects and your contribution, and be clear as to why you’re making this case. When thinking of a figure, aim higher rather than lower. This will leave room for negotiation, and both you and your boss can settle on a figure acceptable to both parties. If you’re unsure of a figure, research similar roles in your field. Be wary of driving too hard a bargain, however.

If an increase to your pay packet isn’t an option, consider alternatives like a company car or the option to work from home.

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