Ireland’s Guide To Money And Living

Consumer watch

Consumer watch

Free or ‘free’?

‘Free’ is always an eye-catching word, as most of us enjoy getting something for nothing, even if it’s just a free sample from the local supermarket. But, The Irish Times’ Fiona Reddan warns this week, free doesn’t always necessarily mean free, and consumers should be aware of the full picture, from medical care to subsidised health insurance.

“When it comes to our finances, however, we’re often faced with tempting offers that need a bit of consideration before we get too excited. A little bit of information and knowledge can help you sift through the real ‘deals’ and those that are that little bit less attractive when you peer behind them,” says Reddan.

Positive financial habits

Financial literacy is important for children, but many adults lack the knowledge to teach the younger generation about making good financial decisions, Irish Financial Review’s Frank Conway argues in the Irish Independent this week. Conway has made it his mission to teach financial literacy to all ages over the past few years, and recently launched Ollie – The Money Magazine for Kids, which aims to teach children between the ages of 7 to 11 about financial matters.

“Teaching adults core money skills is crucial if they are to successfully manage their future money needs. But the financial education journey must start much sooner than adulthood,” Conway writes. “Children as young as three begin to develop money awareness and at seven are developing lifelong money habits. It is crucial that early intervention prevents them from adopting poor money habits.”

Budget hikes in Dublin

Finally, those living in social housing in Dublin could be facing an extra €100 bill to get their boiler serviced. Dublin City Council is facing a budget deficit of €15m, and is considering a number of measures to make up the shortfall. According to TheJournal.ie, businesses will also face hikes in commercial rates of around 1%.

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When not writing about all things personal finance, You & Your Money's editor Conor Forrest enjoys reading, football and getting lost in an ocean of Wikipedia articles.
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