Ireland’s Guide To Money And Living

Consumer watch

consumer

Contactless – the good and the bad

Contactless payments make paying for goods and services an even easier task – simply tap your card against the terminal and you can pay within seconds for amounts of up to €30, without having to enter your pin. According to the Irish Independent, however, elderly people are now vulnerable to family members using their cards without permission – they may not realise they are in possession of a contactless card.

Last month, Age Action launched a campaign to highlight financial abuse of the elderly. “Older people and more vulnerable members of our society are at particular risk of being targets for fraud and financial abuse. As a bank, we are working hard to raise awareness of these issues and to protect customers against financial loss from scams and financial elder abuse,” said Pauline McKiernan, Ulster Bank, which which has worked with Age Action since 2014.

Water bills to cease

Irish Water will cease to send bills to households from this month, according to thejournal.ie. Charges have been suspended for the year, with both the organisation’s future and water charges to be decided by a water commission. The article notes that householders who haven’t paid still remain liable for charges until March 2016, and that billing could recommence at the end of the year.

Budget travel

With our summer once again failing to properly materialise you may find yourself unconsciously navigating to Skyscanner.ie or TripAdvisor, just to catch a glimpse of any deals that could bring you to a sandy beach with turquoise waters. Good news – The Irish Times has gathered a list of 27 ways to travel the globe on a tight budget, supplied by seasoned travellers and booking agents. That includes the best value regions (Southeast Asia and South Africa), seeing the sights on foot, planning as much as possible, and catching your flight during certain timeframes to save money.

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When not writing about all things personal finance, You & Your Money's editor Conor Forrest enjoys reading, football and getting lost in an ocean of Wikipedia articles.
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