Ireland’s Guide To Money And Living

Consumer watch

Consumer watch

Taking the plunge

Getting married in the near future or not-so-distant future? Though you’ll often hear horrifying tales of couples plunged into significant debt in order to have one special day, you can still have a fantastic day without paying for it for the next 10 or 20 years.

That’s the topic of choice for John Cradden in the Irish Independent this week, in which he advocates a number of cost-saving measures, including a pruned guest list (no need to invite passing acquaintances), making use of your talented family and friends, within reason, and opting to pay in cash where possible.

Combating theft

If you suddenly realise your phone has been stolen, and you haven’t taken advantage of a GPS tracking app or setting, it’s hard to feel anything other than helpless. According to An Garda Síochána, which has launched an anti-theft campaign to coincide with St. Patrick’s Day, you can take steps to protect yourself in the event of someone stealing your phone – recording your phone’s IMEI number, ideally as a screenshot.

Rent rise

Finally, it’s official – rental prices in Dublin have surpassed those experienced at their previous height in 2007. Data from the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB) Quarterly Rent Index highlighted a 0.4% increase on prices in the capital nine years ago. Outside Dublin, however, rental prices are 14.5% off the 2007 peak.

The cost of renting also rose in the last quarter of 2015 – an increase of €124 for a house in Dublin between Q4 2014 and Q4 2015, and €105 for an apartment. Outside of Dublin, the respective increases are €64 and €67 over the 12 month period.

Commenting on the latest report, a spokesperson for PTRB, which now offers free mediation services between landlords and tenants, took the opportunity to remind landlords regarding the tenancy legislation which came into effect last December. “That provides that rent may only be increased once in a 24-month period (previously 12 months). It also provides that 90 days advance notice must be given prior to any increase (previously 28 days).”

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When not writing about all things personal finance, You & Your Money's editor Conor Forrest enjoys reading, football and getting lost in an ocean of Wikipedia articles.
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