Ireland’s Guide To Money And Living

Consumer watch

Consumer watch

Ryanair baggage warning

Many of us have been there when flying – your carry-on is perhaps a little over the limit but you chance it anyway, particularly as checked baggage can be expensive. Generally, there isn’t an issue. However, as the Irish Examiner reports this week, Ryanair has warned its passengers that they must comply with its carry-on policies or the company will be forced to review those policies.

The move comes as we approach the ‘peak summer period’, with luggage capacities stretched to breaking point. “Customers are permitted to bring a normal cabin bag and a smaller bag onboard and the allowance of a second bag has been one of our most popular “Always Getting Better” improvements,” said Kenny Jacobs, Chief Marketing Officer. “However, we’ve noticed some customers are bringing larger than permitted bags onboard, which can cause delays, and our policy may be reviewed should this practice continue.”

Saving stats

Are you setting aside a portion of your income for a rainy day? Research by Irish Life has shown that over two-thirds of people are saving again. However, one-third have no savings, not being able to afford to do so. Other highlights from the study include more women saving when compared to men (67% vs 59%), 43% of people are saving more than €100 a month, with those living in Dublin saving the most overall.

“It’s positive to see that people are saving. However, we are helping people to understand that they can significantly enhance their financial position in retirement by starting to save into a pension, or by even increasing the amount they save in addition to any employer pension contributions they may receive,” says Tony Lawless, Managing Director, Irish Life Corporate Business.

New car?

Finally, if you’re planning on acquiring a 172 car via PCP (personal contract plan), The Irish Times‘ Fiona Reddan and Peter Hamilton offer some useful advice on navigating these potentially tricky waters.

“…If things go awry, you could find yourself in a mess of debt, owing more than the car is actually worth – or you may have to walk away with nothing to show despite having paid two-thirds of the value of the car,” they write.

Share
When not writing about all things personal finance, You & Your Money's editor Conor Forrest enjoys reading, football and getting lost in an ocean of Wikipedia articles.
Share
Share